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Black Lives Matter

We’d like to take this opportunity to use our platform in order to encourage you to listen to and support Black voices. If you need references, we’ve made this list of resources with the kind help of Masha from the podcast, Bold Adulting.

Pride Flags

  • Pride Flag SD: Queer owned and run! All flags are made with sustainably sourced American materials by hand by a team of 7. Located in our hometown of San Diego. Follow them on Instagram too, where you can follow their progress as they donate to different queer BIPOC organizations @PrideFlagSD
  • DCHomos: Inclusive Pride Flags (The popularity and reach online has given DCHomos the ability to fundraise for many local non-profits and organizations as well as become involved in sponsoring and hosting events such as the Ask Rayceen Show, events for The DC Center, H.I.P.S., and Trans Latinx DMV, Casa Ruby, SMYAL, Whitman Walker, Time Out Youth (NC) and many more. DCHomos has made a commitment to continue to uplift and amplify marginalized voices in the DC community and beyond. DCHomos really tries to keep their prices low because visibility and accessibility is important. And they’re wonderfully helpful and responsive!)

Resources

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letters

“Rats” and “Seven Year Anniversary”

In this episode:

  • “Glue traps are fucked up. Never in my childhood had my anti-pesticide, anti-poison, clean the house with vinegar, hippies-that-take-showers kind of parents ever used glue traps. The battle against the rodents must have taken a desperate turn for them to resort to this kind of weapon.” – Sam
  • “So anyway, the point is really that  my husband would be the kind of guy to have faked his own death…. and I did wonder for a couple of weeks if he was going to send me some encrypted message from Costa Rica with instructions on how to join him with Babbs.” – Tawny
  • “Now, crickets must die because they disturb my slumber, but I hate hate hate squishing them. And for some reason, killing ants is not a big deal. But I’ve never had to put down a mammal, even to end its own misery. ” – Sam
  • “I find comfort in thinking, “Well, at least, this is great material,” as I continue to observe all the chaos and drama around me. That’s not to say my life is purely dead husbands and PTSD induced flashbacks of his body on our kitchen floor…. ” – Tawny
  • “I instinctively knew that pretending to be a stand up comedian was going to keep me from having PTSD flashbacks about this.” – Sam
  • “Now, like many others who were quarantined whilst living alone, COVID has worsened my already existing case of “deprived and thirsty bitch syndrome.” So when I heard a dude’s voice go, “Hey,” you can bet your sweet socially distanced ass that I stopped to see who was talking to me.” – Tawny
  • “A bokken is a wooden practice sword. Duct tape a hammer to it, and this device of destruction is probably a remnant of my little brother, who like most little brothers, likes to make weapons.” – Sam

More Episodes

Interview With Katie "The Foul Mouthed Widow" Pettigrew Death Is Hilarious

  1. Interview With Katie "The Foul Mouthed Widow" Pettigrew
  2. Interview With Comedian Roscoe Burnems
  3. Interview With Comedian Mimi Hayes
Categories
letters

“My Frodo Baggins” and “The Little Mermaid”

In this episode:

  • “Or maybe I was just corrupted by the Satanic Bible on that fateful night and that’s why Laura Ingraham started to sound like an idiot to my awakening teenage brain.” – Tawny
  • “Our theme is coping with grief and trauma using humor, and, well, a lot of the trauma I have to joke about, isn’t what people want to hear. I even texted you that the rest of my trauma isn’t funny. I texted YOU, the widow. Like, your husband dying isn’t funny. What was I thinking? “ – Sam
  • “Today marks the six month anniversary of George’s death. It also marks the three years since George and I debuted the Dirty Bits Podcast, which was the show originally found on this podcast feed. We produced the show together after I used to crack him up by summarizing whatever history book or other nerd article I was reading at the time in my best southern Californian take.” – Tawny
  • “People don’t want to joke about death either! You’ve noticed that – the ways they try to tell you that you’re grieving wrong. But there are plenty of batman is an orphan jokes and far fewer touching on the fact that, you know, the Joker abused Harley. Birds of Prey was fun, by the way. But I’m slightly biased because I really like birds. Also, I was disappointed there were no birds.” – Sam
  • “I soon fell into a deep fangirl obsession with all things Peter Jackson and Tolkien but I directed a large amount of my attention to Elijah Wood’s depiction of Frodo, who was the Timothy Chalamet and Adam Driver of 2003. And by that I mean, these are the men you’re attracted to when you don’t quite yet realize you’re attracted to lesbians.” – Tawny
  • “It was the natural place to be after my Christian phase. Which was a solid move, by the way. Like, I didn’t want to keep having sex with my dickhead boyfriend, so I became Christian. Genius! Christians aren’t allowed to have sex! I just took everything my parents taught me about skepticism and progressive thought and threw it into the baptism pool so I could be a born again incel. “ – Sam

More Episodes

Interview With Katie "The Foul Mouthed Widow" Pettigrew Death Is Hilarious

  1. Interview With Katie "The Foul Mouthed Widow" Pettigrew
  2. Interview With Comedian Roscoe Burnems
  3. Interview With Comedian Mimi Hayes
Categories
Uncategorized

Death Is Hilarious

Behind The Show

Tawny’s Story

I married George – my soulmate, best friend, and the love of my life – in August 2016. We then started an audio production and entertainment company together. He was the editor and I was the voice-over talent.

We released the Dirty Bits Podcast in 2017 and were transitioning into producing the show full-time by the following year.

But George was terminally ill. He was born with a congenital heart condition (he had a single ventricle anatomy similar to hypoplastic left heart syndrome). This came with multiple comorbid conditions, one of which eventually led George to contract a respiratory disease similar to tuberculosis (mycobacterium avium complex) when he was just 29. He passed away due to related complications on November 8, 2019.

In the six months leading up to his death, George was mostly homebound, on 5 liters of oxygen, and I was practicing social distancing. But we were together. It didn’t matter that I only left the house to do the grocery shopping and walk our little dog. I was with George and we were in comedy together. If he had been healthy, it would have been a pretty perfect life.

When he abruptly died in our home, I was overwhelmed by the grief and the isolation that comes with mourning the loss of your soulmate.

The only thing that’s been able to give me any relief has been comedy.

George and I shared a dark sense of humor. It’s what we used to cope with our often dark reality. Because if you can laugh at death, trauma, and tragedy you can take away much of its power.

So I started using our comedy podcast in order to cope. I began interviewing other podcasters and creatives on how they were using dark humor to get through their grief, loss, and trauma. These episodes were the beginning of what is now Death Is Hilarious.

I wasn’t able to take the time to plan out the transition of this podcast from the Dirty Bits to Death is Hilarious like I wanted to. It’s been largely experimental and my listeners have been witness to what seems like a behind the scenes look into how I navigate my grief using various art forms like writing, stand-up comedy, podcasting, and performing.

It’s taken a few months and a few different formats to find my footing. And while I’ve had many different creative partners on this journey with me, one of the most consistent partners has been my dear friend, Sam.

We went to high school together and have worked on many artistic projects together since around 2007. Sam was also the mutual friend who set up George and me!

George’s death has been really hard for Sam too and we began coping by channeling our grief into comedy… specifically by writing each other funny letters about how we’re dealing with not only death and loss, but other traumas in our lives. Those letters are something I’d like to share with you on this show, Death is Hilarious, in addition to interviews with our special guests from your favorite podcasts, YouTube channels, and more.

I hope you too can find some healing and relief in our version of radical acceptance – with stories, friendship, and lots of jokes.

Tawny Platis